Dr. Philip J. Ivanhoe – Confucianism: Then and Now

Is the Chinese regime’s goal of a “harmonious society” consistent with traditional Confucian values? In a short lecture to the Midshipmen, Dr. Philip J. Ivanhoe–former Marine, philosopher at Georgetown University, and author of Oneness: East Asian Conceptions of Virtue, Happiness and How We Are All Connected – provides insights into Confucian ethics and its political implications.  A […]

Captain Ryan Bernacchi, Dr. Mark LiVecche – Top Gun Maverick

In the latest edition of the podcast “True North,” Marc LiVecche, the McDonald Distinguished Scholar of Ethics, War, and Public Life at Providence speaks with Captain Ryan Bernacchi, USN (Ret.) about Top Gun: Maverick. Ryan Bernacchi is a former TOPGUN instructor who served as a naval aviator and leader for 25 years. He has flown more than 4,000 […]

Dr. Jovana Davidovik – “What’s Wrong with Wanting a Human in the Loop?”

 In a new paper article published in The Texas National Security Review’s journal War on the Rocks, Stockdale Center Senior Fellow Jovana Davidovic, address and challenges a common presupposition of much of the literature on Artificial Intelligence.  The title makes plain her challenge:   “What’s Wrong with Wanting a Human in the Loop?” The introduction of the paper: At the […]

Dr. James Giordano, Dr. Diane DiEuliis, “Balancing Act: Precision Medicine and National Security”

In a new paper published in Military Medicine, Stockdale Center Distinguished Fellow Dr James Giordano, and Dr Diane DiEuliis of National Defense University address the promise, possibilities and problems posed by advances in precision medicine to public health and national security. The Abstract of the paper: Developments in genetics, pharmacology, biomarker identification, imaging, and interventional biotechnology are enabling […]

How should the laws of armed conflict address the rise of AI-augmented decision-making?

Recently, significant effort has gone into deciding what is the appropriate space for algorithmic decision making in domestic law.[1] From discussions about the constitutionality of police officers’ use of algorithms to justify probable cause, to debates about use of recidivism algorithms in parole hearings, and the use of machine learning to aid judges in deciding on […]

A Code of Ethics for the US Armed Services? A Counterpoint

An Ethics Code for the Armed Forces: A Counterpoint Col Bonadonna’s central thesis is clearly stated up front: “The American military needs a code of ethics.”  He argues such a code would “communicate a commitment to the American people.” He goes on to claim “the code would serve as doctrine…concerning the most vital ethical underpinnings of […]

The Least Abhorrent Choice?

The Least Abhorrent Choice?  When gaging the morality of the use of atomic weapons to end the Asia Pacific War, one of the things we are obliged to consider is the likely consequences of other options available at the time. We should project their likely efficacy with regard to bringing about timely capitulation with a […]

Were the A-Bombs the Last Resort?

Last August marked the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima; three days later a second bomb obliterated Nagasaki. As early as August 9, the day of the Nagasaki explosion, the Federal Council of Churches of Christ wired President Harry S. Truman: Many Christians deeply disturbed over use of atomic bombs against Japanese cities because of […]

Dr. Ed Barrett, Dr. Peter Berkowitz and Dr. Patrick Deneen – “Liberal Democracy: Fatally Flawed or Merely Challenged?”

Are liberal democracies fatally flawed or merely challenged? An online discussion with two renowned scholars: Patrick Deneen, University of Notre Dame, author of “Why Liberalism Failed” and Peter Berkowitz, Stanford University, author of “Constitutional Conservatism: Liberty, Self-Government and Political Moderation.”Drs. Deneen and Berkowitz are interviewed by the Center’s own Dr. Ed Barrett. This is followed […]